How passion is exploited

Andrew Leung
3 min readNov 28, 2023
Photo by Indra Utama on Unsplash

We’ve all heard the expression that if you love what you do you’ll never work a day in your life. Or, that if you follow your passion you will find the career that you love. In reality while there are many instances of people finding their professional loves by following their passions. Passion has also become a tool that is used to create unequal and exploitive relationships with work.

When it comes to employers, they look for passion from employees at all levels. They take this passion and use it to engender behaviors that don’t allow for work life balance. Work life balance has faced criticism, as something that doesn’t necessarily promote success. But since success is such a subjective measurement, it will vary on a case-by-case basis. Typically what you will see is the push to work longer hours, take fewer breaks, and go well beyond the extra mile. While this can certainly be seen in specific industries such as finance, tech, and medicine to name a few it is very prevalent in other sectors as well. Most of the time all of these things are a demonstration of your passion and commitment. More often than not those who fail to meet those standards of passion face ridicule and threats of losing jobs or opportunities. Then there are other jobs where you may not face those types of conditions, instead, you face poor working conditions. These tend to be more so based in social good, where the idea is that you are working on a mission bigger than yourself and any complaints or gripes mean you don’t care about the bigger picture. Pay also tends to be lower in these types of occupations. Employees often know they could be better compensated elsewhere, but the pressures of “doing the right thing” and they stay because they care about the cause.

With all of this in mind what can you, the employee at any level do? The first thing you need to do is determine what your priorities are. You need to recognize what type of work situation you are in. Do you feel like its worth it to stay where you are and is there anyone affected by your choices? More often than not we make choices to stay where we are most comfortable because it is human nature and there can be a variety of factors that make us stay in different situations. This is a personal evaluation of what your needs are, and this needs to be unbiased, based on all of the different needs in your life. In all of…

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Andrew Leung

I will be sharing the plain and honest: truths, pros and cons as well as my experiences of Personal Finance, Side Hustles, and Investing.